10 Common Childhood Illnesses and How to Spot Them

Common Childhood Illnesses


All children get sick from time to time, but recognizing the warning signs of common childhood illnesses can make the recovery process go much more smoothly. Here are 10 common childhood illnesses, their symptoms, and ways you can help your child if he or she gets sick.


All children get sick from time to time, but recognizing the warning signs of common childhood illnesses can make the recovery process go much more smoothly. Here are 10 common childhood illnesses, their symptoms, and ways you can help your child if he or she gets sick.



1) Frequent headaches

Headaches are a common childhood illness that can be caused by many different things. The most common cause of headaches in children is tension headaches, which can be caused by stress, anxiety, or poor sleep habits. Below is a list of other potential causes of headaches in children


2) Ear Infections

Every year, about 1 million children in the United States get ear infections. Ear contaminations are additionally called intense otitis media. This happens when the fluid that has built up in your child's middle ear gets infected with bacteria or a virus.


3) Diarrhea or Vomiting

Diarrhea or vomiting are both common symptoms of childhood diseases, especially in children under the age of two. Diarrhea is caused by a virus called Rotavirus and can be fatal in extreme cases, so it is important for parents to know the symptoms. Symptoms of Rotavirus include fever, stomachache, nausea, vomiting, and watery stools. Other causes of diarrhea are Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) or Norovirus.


4) Excessive Coughing

Excessive coughing is a common symptom of childhood illnesses. It's usually caused by a respiratory infection, though it can be due to asthma, allergies, or the flu. If your child has been excessively coughing for more than a few days, schedule an appointment with their doctor. The doctor will ask if your child is experiencing any other symptoms such as fever, runny nose, sore throat, chest pain, or wheezing.


5) Persistent Fever

Persistent fever is a symptom of many childhood diseases, so it's important that parents know how to spot the symptoms. Persistent fever can be caused by a wide variety of ailments including influenza, enterovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, rhinovirus, or strep throat. To determine what the cause is, your child's doctor will ask about their symptoms: duration of illness, frequency of vomiting or diarrhea, and whether they have a rash or sore throat.


6) Rashes

Rashes are a common symptom of many childhood diseases. Below is a list of 10 common childhood illnesses, the symptoms they produce, and what you can do if you suspect your child has been infected. - Chickenpox: A rash with red bumps that turn into blisters filled with fluid. The rash typically appears first on the face, chest, stomach, arms, legs, and feet before spreading to other parts of the body.


7) Red Eyes

Red eyes may be a sign of conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye. This is an infection or inflammation of the thin membrane that lines your eyelids. Pink eye can be caused by a virus or bacteria, which are contagious and spread easily from person to person. Conjunctivitis starts with watery red eyes, often accompanied by itching, burning, crusting, swelling of the eyelids, or sensitivity to light.


8) Sneezing without an Allergy

It's not uncommon for a child to have an allergy and sneeze. But if they sneeze without being exposed to anything that they're allergic to, then it might be one of the following 10 common childhood illnesses.


9) Swollen Glands or Lymph Nodes

Swollen glands can be a sign of infectious mononucleosis or glandular fever, which are both common childhood illnesses. The lymph nodes in your neck will also be swollen if you have glandular fever. If you suspect that you have one of these illnesses, see your doctor as soon as possible.


10) Wheezing Without a Cold or Allergy

Wheezing is a common symptom of asthma. When you have an asthma attack, your airways narrow and breathing becomes more difficult. You may feel the sensation of a tightening chest or a sense of panic as you gasp for air. Wheezing is often the first sign that your asthma has flared up, but it can also occur in people who don't have asthma or any other lung condition.

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